The Future Skills Program

The most important thing in life is your health. Health starts with sleeping well. Actually, without it you’ll die (Why We Sleep, Matthew Walker).

Sleep, like food, is one of very few things evolution just can’t get rid of. Despite the huge downsides to lying unconscious and defenseless in nature among predators and parasites, humans on average do it one third of their lives.

The Health And Financial Freedom loop

In order to control your time enough to sleep the way you’re intended to, you need financial freedom, lest there will always be a boss or a client making demands on your time when optimally you’d be sleeping or playing.

Further, attaining economic independence through a specialist, entrepreneurial, leadership or investment career in a world of accelerating technological development means you need as agile a mind as possible.

Enter sleep and play:

Research done during mainly the last two decades (c.f. the amazing books “The Real Happy Pill” and “Why We Sleep”) increasingly show the importance of regular exercise and sleeping well for strenghtening our cognitive capabilities (coping with stress, anxiety and depression, increasing your focus, memory, creativity, and happiness; and combating and postponing dementia). Proper nutrition, not least for promoting a healthy and diverse microbiome, is also an important part of shaping a future proof and capable mind-body machine.

So you can see how you need sleep and exercise to boost your financial standing; and economic independence to optimize your sleeping habits and general health.

Creating the Future Skills Program

Since I left the finance industry (I was a portfolio manager at a very successful hedge fund for 15 years: Futuris – The European Hedge Fund Of The Decade), I’ve spent a considerable amount of time thinking about what made Futuris not just great, but the greatest money manager in Europe for a full decade.

From the Future Skills Program (Finance Module)

Over the last year, I’ve finally come around to distilling my investment insights into a series of videos, with accompanying detailed course notes and exercises.

Three decades of investing lessons and best practices distilled

In the Future Skills Program, I explain the investment methodology and practices I’ve honed during the last 30 years.

They include what I’ve picked up from business school (M.Sc. in Finance at SSE 1990-1994), as a financial analyst specializing in IT and investment companies (1994-2000), as a portfolio manager (2000-2015) with focus on software, services and finance, and finally as a private equity investor 2015-2019.

From the Future Skills Program (Finance Module)

A robust health, sound decision management practices and career planning are as integral to designing a good life as investing prowess. Therefore, I and my partners have put together a complete Future Skills Program, including chapters about networking and career advice, value investing and personal development. I’m in charge of the Advanced Career (6) and Finance videos (16).

Please note that I’ve hesitated to participate in creating this course. All the topics discussed are complex matters without simple answers. The course details what you need to work on and in what direction to focus your energy, but you’re still the one having to put in the dedication and work.

We can only show you the door, but it is you who have to walk through it.

If you’re ready to take real responsibility for your life, career, risk management and finances, check out the course program in detail here:


Värdebaserad investering och teknisk analys

Passiva investeringar och teknisk analys

Det här är valda utdrag från en artikel som finns i sin helhet här

Investeringar kräver att kapitalet kommer tillbaka

Det är bara några årtionden sedan idén om passiv indexinvestering förverkligades i Vanguards första aktiefond. De första tio åren var det få som noterade fonden, vars kontroversiella namn till slut godkändes av det praktiska skälet att den därmed sorterades intill moderbolaget Wellington (!)

Någon annans problem blir förr eller senare ditt

Teorin bakom ej värdebaserad investering är att “någon annan”, t.ex. “marknaden”, antas göra värderingsarbetet och att det inte är någon idé att vare sig uppfinna hjulet på nytt eller försöka tävla om att göra ett bättre arbete än dessa förmodade superproffs.

I korthet kan man säga att teknisk analys bygger på idén att fundamental värdebaserad investering innebär för mycket, för svårt och för hårt konkurrensutsatt jobb med för dålig timersättning för att vara värt det.

TA-folket bortser från att konkurrensen är hårdare inom TA eftersom det är många fler som sysslar med det.

Fördel TA: Passiva investerare och tekniska analytiker kan flyta med hela vägen upp i en övervärdering utan begränsningar i form av att det “inte är motiverat”.

En annan fördel är att de självförstärkande trender som skapas av passiva investerare har kortare fas.

Tre investeringsstrategier

Tre av de mest effektiva placeringsstrategierna tar hänsyn till både trender, cykler och värdering:

Månadsspara i aktier

För det första…

Tillgångsslagsallokering

För det andra kan man…

Värdebaserad indexomviktning

Ytterst få kan hantera den tredje strategin…

Men, det finns en kompromiss som fungerar både i praktiken och har en sund teoretisk bas utan att kräva alltför mycket tid och resurser av användaren. Så här ser metoden ut uppdelad i fem enkla steg.

———-

… rör sig sällan mer än upp till tio procent per år. Det medför att värderingsmultiplarna dras tillbaka mot ett genomsnittsvärde efter tillfälliga sentimentsstyrda extremvärden.

Du hittar som sagt artikeln i sin helhet som en gästblogg här

Asset Allocation Ahead of the Algo Apocalypse

Gold, softs, small caps, hedge funds

Cutting to the chase, if I were a CFA I would recommend a portfolio with 10% in gold, 10% in soft commodities (agricultural products like wheat, corn, coffee, cacao, sugar etc.), 20% in a trusted global small cap fund, and 60% in a basket of different hedge fund strategies.

Disclaimer: Nothing on my site is to be construed as recommendations to buy or sell anything. All my writing is for educational and entertainment purposes, so be a responsible adult and consult a professional financial consultant before putting any money at risk, anywhere. Again: I don’t make recommendations. Never. Ever.

My own asset portfolio currently consists of an apartment, ten private companies, and various fixed income streams (loans and obligations). And precious metals.

Oh, and my girlfriend manages a little money for me, a portfolio that currently is exposed to, e.g., Spotify, Hennes & Mauritz, Gran Colombia Gold, Azelio and various soft commodity ETFs.

FAQ

I’m often asked what to invest in. It’s a hard question to answer. It depends on who’s asking, how much risk they can take, i.e., if they’ll freak out if they lose 5%, 10% or 50% in the interim, what their investment horizon is, and not least how active they will be.

By the way, did you know I’ve learned everything I know about strategy and perseverence by Adrian at TQM? Okay, not everything, but he has added a lot of value regarding not least mindset through his 30 Challenges, newsletters and more (affiliate link – the reason I have one is that we approve of each other’s material).

There are several categories of answers, including the following:

  • Don’t invest at all. Just live it up as you get your hands on the money, or keep a buffer at the bank. The strategy is called: invest everything in your personal experience while you still have the time and energy.
  • Set aside a fixed amount every month and buy a global stock index for the money. Don’t look at the result for 40 years. Zero time and resources wasted.
  • Buy precious metals for 90% of your wealth. I’ll help you re-allocate when it’s time in a few years or so. Highly contrarian, zero income-generating, advice-contingent strategy.
  • Go for the Dogs Of Dow, with annual weight adjustments, i.e., a stocks only, slightly sophisticated strategy, with medium level maintenance
  • Invest everything in your own education, skills and business
  • Just buy a basket of hedgefunds and go back to sleep
  • Create and maintain a true asset allocation strategy with medium-frequent adjustments: stocks + fixed income + real assets (real estate, precious metals, commodities) + businesses (own, private equity).

The last bullet point warrants its own full text book, but I’ll try to break it down in just a few paragraphs.

Asset Allocation

First, some would advocate fixed weights for the various asset classes; 25% each if you choose four different pizza slices, 20% each if five and so on. I think you should be way blder than that. Risky assets like certain categories of listed stocks and private equity perform much better than the others during equity bull markets, as well as in total over time. Take advantage of that by on average allocating more than a “fair” share to equities.

Second, the weights shouldn’t be static, but dynamic and dependent on A) absolute valuation metrics, B) relative valuation metrics, C) recent performance (in particular stock market crashes that last 2 years).

Third, we are different, and thus there is no way you could invest the same way I do. I can make new assessments and investment calls every day if I’d like, and you don’t have access to information about when I change my mind.

When I describe a good portfolio allocation, I consider how I think the investor will manage the portfolio when I’m not looking, as well as how I think they’ll react to paper losses.

Fourth, as a general rule, over the very long term some kind of exposure to the general profit making part of growing economies is warranted. Ergo: over time most people should load up on stocks, perhaps even with a little leverage on average.

Leverage

I hesitated over that last statement, since most people aren’t equipped to decide when to use leverage, what kind of leverage and how much leverage. Consequently, most people use too much at precisely the wrong time and end up permanently destroying their capital.

On an economy-wide level this tendency is apparent in NYSE margin loan statistics, corporate indebtedness statistics and not least buyback and insider buying data series. Loans, leverage, buybacks and insider buying always peaks right before serious market downturns.

That tragic historic fact aside, there are times to use smart leverage, and it’s right when the mentioned data series are near their lows. Unfortunately loans can be hard to get just when you want one, so you have to secure your loan earlier but hold off using the money until you get a fat enough pitch.

Alright, back to the portfolio allocation decision. This is what I told a friend earlier today:

  • 10-20% gold
  • 10-20% (soft, agri) commodities
  • 20% global small caps managed by a trusted and experienced PM
  • 40-60% a basket of various hedge funds with uncorrelated strategies

Why gold?

Gold and commodities are very cheap compared to stocks and the amount of currency in circulation, not to mention the vast quantities of outstanding credit and derivatives. In addition to all that government welfare promises require inflation or money printing of hitherto unheard of proportions.

If you own real stuff like gold, silver, uranium, real estate or a business, you only sell if the money you get in return will buy you some other real stuff you want in a reasonable quantity. When the amount of money in circulation doubles, you can expect prices on all tangibles to double too. Don’t sell for less, nobody else will.

Liqudity sloshing

So far mainly stocks have been on the receiving end, but the liquidity sloshing around the system is bound to reach metals and food sooner or later.

In any case, most governments have taken on more debt than they can handle with the current monetary system, and when they perform a re-set, it will most likely be against a basket of various moneys — including gold. It’s around that time, shortly after the re-set, a gold owner makes the switch from gold to stocks.

However, since you never know how far a bull market can go, or how far the madness of central bankers can push the system to avoid a crash on their watch, you’re more or less forced to hold some stocks at all times.

Right now, I advocate a minimum of stocks in relation to your average strategy, since we are within the 5% most expensive, euphoric, overbought and long-lived bull markets of all time. For some, like me, that means close to 0% listed stocks, or even outright net short stocks! In practice, however, I’m actually around 1% net long listed stocks. In addition, my private equity holdings amount to maybe 50% of my net worth, although it’s pretty hard to estimate their value at this point.

And then there is gold/silver, loans and real estate.

Well, that’s me. And you’re not me. Neither is my friend. I told him I like (Swedish) Robur’s global small cap fund that’s managed by Jens Barnevik. And as a basket of hedge funds I always mention Brummer Multi Strategy with 2x built-in leverage.

I have all my private pension money in BMS2xL, and I estimate that alone would be enough to carry me from retirement to the grave in a reasonably comfortable way.

However, that’s how things look now, when gold and commodities are cheap, P2P loans yield 7-10%, some corporate bonds even more, not to mention my private loans where the range is truly huge, and stocks are at their most expensive in 200 years right at the top of a record long expansion and the build-up of more leverage than ever at record-speed.

Algo-apocalypse or U-zombie

After what could either be an algo-apocalypse, a 75% crash in record time, or a drawn out, slow zombie death by a thousand cuts, U-formed profit recession, the tables will most likely have turned completely.

In the latter case, imagine impotent but vengeful central bankers spewing helicopter money over everone and everything they can shake a stick at, while companies fight tooth and nail to make their bond holders whole, and consequently having to cut back on investments, employees and growth. One company’s cutbacks and slow growth means less sales for another.

Thus the zombie disease of investment cutbacks spreads to the whole system. Nervous bond holders keep counting coupons and return of capital, while business owners constantly stare Chapter 11 in the face.

When stock market valuations have normalized, started to normalize, or possibly are going through a period of undershooting, it’s time to overweight equities, while underweighting all other asset classes. Maybe you should even go as far as consider going more than 100% long equities, if you have access to controlled and reliable financing and are dead sure of a secure line of income.

But which equities? Well, once again the Dogs Of Dow could be a place to look. Or stalwart cyclicals. Banks usually perform well after a (financial) crash. But beware of highly indebted companies, if I’m right that the downturn will be drawn out. Some of the latter might default given long time enough to recovery.

Too hard

If you realize this simply is too much work for you, perhaps somebody else should manage your money for you. Or you should aim for one of the simpler strategies.

That’s why I always come back to a portfolio of gold, fixed income, stocks and hedge funds.

Gold is your insurance against systemic risks and rampant inflation, and your source of purchase resources after a stack market crash. Fixed income takes care of your most urgent everyday needs. Stocks makes sure you get some of the upward drift of the world economy (although I really think everybody should try to at least perform some market timing, like buying much more after two negative years, or sell most when stocks are 100% more expensive than the historic average).

And finally, a basket of hedgefunds puts hundreds of brilliant absolute return focused asset managers to work, doing their best to create decent performance in both bull and bear markets in a wide range of uncorrelated asset classes. If you want risky assets-like performance but don’t want stock market crash-like downside, products like Brummer Multi Strategy (2xL) should form the basis of your portfolio.

Please note that I used to work at Brummer & Partners (2000-2014), but don’t have any affiliation with the group today. I just happen to like the product.

So, where did all of this put us?

Avoid stocks now and focus on gold, agri and a diversified basket of hedgefunds. Be prepared to allocate your money the other way around after a crash, but keep in mind it might be a U-shaped recovery that takes more than the usual 2 years before a clear uptrend is established. Look to Japan and some European indices for guidance. How should you best have played the Nikkei between 1990 and 2010?

Make sure you sleep well. The point of all wealth is well-being

Loans, including P2P loans, will probably be honored over time, which at the same time will be an important reason for the slow recovery. Size your exposure intelligently so you can sleep well at night when thinking about the individuals that might or might not be able to meet the payments due to you. Just don’t rely on them to provide ample liquidity when you want to go levered long the stock market in 2026. For that you’ll need gold.

P.S. Remember that guy Adrian at TQM that I mentioned above? Check out his 30 Challenges here (affiliate link), if you’re interested in a method to establish surprisingly effective habits. As an investor you’ll need it, since your hardest job is keeping yourself in check.